Board 7 Both Vul - Dealer South

 

♠ A
---
A Q 9 3
♣ A K 10 9 7 6 5 3

 

♠ Q 7 4 3
9 7 2
J 10 8 2
♣ 8 4

 

♠ K J 10 8 6 5 2
K 10 4 3
6 4
♣ ---

 

♠ 9
A Q J 8 6 5
K 7 5
♣ Q J 2

 

Pairs

Contract

Scores

MPs

NS

EW

Bid

By

Ld

NS

EW

NS

EW

1

12

6N+1

N

S8

1470

 

20.8

1.2

2

14

5S-3

E

CQ

300

 

0.1

21.9

3

2

6N+1

N

S2

1470

 

20.8

1.2

4

4

6C+1

N

D6

1390

 

15.4

6.6

7

9

3N+4

N

S8

720

 

11

11

8

11

6C+1

N

D5

1390

 

15.4

6.6

9

13

6C+1

N

SJ

1390

 

15.4

6.6

10

1

4H+1

S

S3

650

 

6.6

15.4

11

3

5C+2

N

S2

640

 

3.4

18.6

12

6

4N+2

S

D2

690

 

8.8

13.2

13

8

5C+2

N

D4

640

 

3.4

18.6


The jump shift response (17 February 2010)

Jump shift responses (eg 1H-2S) are fairly uncommon, and should be restricted to two types of hand, both showing at least 16 hcp. The first type is where responder has a long solid holding of the jump shift suit, whilst the second is where responder has at least 4 card support for opener, together with at least 5 good cards in the jump shift suit. Jump shifts should not be used where the responder has 2 good suits of his own: these are better shown by reverse responses or Fourth Suit Forcing etc.

In the above Board, the ideal bidding sequence would be: 1H-3C (jump shift)-4C (South can show club support and slam interest immediately)-4D (cue bid showing AD)-4H (AH)-4S (AS)-5D(KD)-7NT (Once South has shown KD, North can count 13 tricks and can bid 7NT rather than 7C).

An enterprising East might butt into the above sequence with a pre-emptive 4S bid, possibly restricting North/South to 6C. If West joins in the action by raising Eastís bid to 5S, sacrifices of 6Sx-4(-1100) or even 7Sx-5 (-1400) could be reached, which would probably give excellent match-point scores at tournament level, if the North/South field were generally bidding grand slams. Not for the faint-hearted!